OVERSEAS NATIONAL AIRWAYS

CAPTAIN MILT MARSHALL, A LAST GREETING

SINCERE CONDOLENCES TO THE
FAMILY FROM THE ONA CREW


CAPTAIN MILT MARSHALL IN MEMORIAM

ONA CREW IN MOURNING AT THE LOSS OF AN
OUTSTANDING AVIATOR AND FRIEND,
MILT MARSHALL IS NO LONGER WITH US,
GOD BLESS HIS SWEET MEMORY
  • Regret hearing of Milt Marshall's untimely death.
    I hired him when he came with ONA. A sorrowful loss.
    Chief Pilot Robert Love,
    California

  • I am so shocked about the death of Milt Marshall,
    but grateful I saw him at the NY reunion in
    October 2003. I told him I remembered him as a
    wonderful pilot. Sadly, Jacquie Law,
    Bay City, Michigan

  • I had my first flight back in 1966 with Milt
    Marshall and met him at the New York reunion last
    year. It seems unreal he is no longer here.
    Margareta (Wulf) Thaute,
    Alford, Massachusetts

    I am very sorry to hear about Milt Marshall.
    What a tradegy.
    Sincerely, Francesca Hillman,
    California

    Please give my best regards to the family. Milt was a
    good guy and captain.
    Ben Conatser


    Ted Stowe, Milt Marshall and
    Margareta Thaute


    Jacquie Law and Milt Marshall - all 3 photos
    from ONA NEW YORK Friendship Reunion
    October 25, 2003 at Lentini´s.


  • CAPTAIN MILT MARSHALL


    Dave McCloy, Milt Marshall and
    Kathy Grandin Gursel

    Milts´s Ceremony - by Captain George Flavell
    I flew to Newark on Fri the 6th where Tom Murphy
    picked me up and kept me at his house for the weekend.
    Together we picked up Ed Veronelli and Ted Secola and
    met Gordy Strothers at the church. To my knowledge we
    were the only ONA people there. I spoke at the service
    and described the flight that Milt had brought back after
    take off with all four engines failed...wrong fuel on board.

    After that a young man came over to me and asked me if
    I remembered his grandfather, I did, Blacky Blackburn an
    old navigator with us who had retired from PAA.

    The service was nice, the day was beautifull, there
    could have been 200 people there and many stood up
    and spoke.

    Milt´s son was there, had flown in from the
    aircraft carrier "George Washington", which had just
    returned from the Persian Gulf. Kathie, his youngest
    daughter made it through the day which she was
    hopeing to do, since she is pregnant with twin boy's
    due on the 3rd of Sept.
    Milt would have been proud.
    Regards,
    George Flavell

    MESSAGE FROM MILT MARSHALL´S DAUGHTER
    My Dad thought the world of ONA and of everyone
    who worked there. He considered you all very dear
    friends. I can not count the many stories over the
    years that have been told by him, it was always
    apparent that you all had a lot of fun doing
    something that you truly loved. He was so proud
    to have been with such a great company and with
    all of you.

    His obituary was in July 17, 2004 Danbury News Times
    and The Waterbury Republican.
    Please express our thanks and gratitude to
    everyone who has been in touch with me and my
    family. The outpouring has been incredible.
    You all will hold a special place in my heart.

    Much Love,
    Kathie (Marshall) Leonzi

    MEMORIAL SERVICE
    A memorial service is Saturday, August 7, 11:00 a.m.
    at Trinity Lutheran Church, New Milford. Pilots who
    wish to wear their uniforms may do so to pay tribute
    to this consummate pilot and professional aviator.

    In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to
    Trinity Lutheran Church, Route 7 North, New Milford,
    CT 06776 or The Lutheran Home of Southbury,
    990 Main St. North, Southbury, CT 06488.

    Arrangements by Carpino Funeral Home,
    Southbury.

    OUR FRIEND AND COLLEAGUE RIP

    ONA CREW CABIN AND
    COCKPIT SENIORITY









    Lockheed L-188 Electra
    N284F at JFK in 1973












    http://www.NewsTimesLIVE.com
    2004-07-18

    MILTON F MARSHALL
    Milton F. Marshall was reunited with his beloved wife, 
    Carol, on July 10, 2004, when he died in an aviation 
    accident in Ticonderoga, New York. Mr. Marshall, 
    a resident of Roxbury, was born December 2, 
    1928 in Eagle Bend, MN. He was the son of William 
    and Ethel Marshall. He was a member of Trinity 
    Lutheran Church in New Milford and a Mason.
    
    "Milt" enjoyed a 60-year aviation career, most 
    recently as owner and operator of Capital 
    Airlines, Inc., an air charter business and flight 
    school at Waterbury-Oxford Airport. Milt began as 
    a crop duster, joined the U.S. Air Force, and 
    participated in the Berlin Air Lift.
    
    He began a commercial aviation career with Capital 
    Airlines, which was purchased by United Airlines in 
    1960. Captain Marshall went on to the worldwide 
    charter airline, Overseas National Airways. While a 
    pilot at ONA, he was elected to the position of 
    MEC Chairman for the Airline Pilots Association. 
    He later held the position of VP-Flight 
    Operations at ONA. After retirement in 1978, he 
    spent several years as a consultant and 
    pilot with several start-up airlines.
    
    In the early 1980s, he and Carol bought a flight 
    school at Waterbury-Oxford Airport. The couple 
    resurrected the name, Capital Airlines, and secured 
    an air charter certificate. The couple mentored 
    many young people interested in aviation, and 
    many of their students have become professional 
    airline pilots.
    
    He leaves five daughters, 
    
    Stephanie Lynn Weaver 
    and husband Mark, Wauwatosa, WI; Michelle Ann Orser 
    and husband Terry, Royal Oak, MI; 
    
    Lynn Ann Gorman 
    and husband Russell, Bethlehem; 
    
    Kimberly Ann Chandler 
    and husband Major Steven Chandler, Crestview, FL; 
    and 
    
    Kathie Lynn Leonzi and husband Thomas, Woodbury; 
    
    Two sons, 
    Richard Akans II and wife Diane; and 
    
    Navy Commander 
    John Marshall, Virginia Beach, VA; 
    
    Twelve grandchildren, Chad Akans, Elizabeth and 
    Kristin Byrdak; Samuel and Benjamin Weaver; 
    Wesley and Evan Chandler; Russell Gorman Jr.; 
    Erika Allen; Jacqueline Gorman; and Alexis 
    Lynn and Thomas John Leonzi III.









    Article published in the Connecticut Post

    Monday, July 12, 2004

    Oxford pilot killed in crash
    Mystery remains over cause of airplane disaster
    By KEN DIXON and LINDA PINTO, Staff writers

    Milton F. Marshall, a legend at Waterbury-Oxford 
    Airport, where he operated a flight school as owner 
    of Capital Airlines, was killed with another man 
    about six miles from an upstate New York airport. 
    The Oxford airport community was somber and 
    distraught Sunday, wondering how such a cautious 
    and experienced pilot could die after more than a 
    half-century of flying. 
    
    A long-time Oxford resident who had recently moved 
    to East Woods Road in Roxbury, Marshall, 76, was 
    piloting a Piper Navajo that plummeted into thick 
    woods and exploded about 85 miles north of Albany 
    at about 9 a.m. Saturday, police said. 
    
    Michael Keilty, 40, of Aspen Lane in the Sandy Hook 
    section of Newtown, was his passenger in the flight 
    from Waterbury-Oxford Airport to upstate New York. 
    Marshall and Keilty were killed after the twin-engine 
    plane was seen circling near a country club west of 
    Ticonderoga, N.Y., police said. 
    It dropped out of sight and witnesses heard a loud 
    explosion.
     
    It crashed in a heavily wooded area of the eastern 
    Adirondacks, near Putnam Pond State Campground, as 
    it was attempting to reach a landing strip at 
    Ticonderoga Airport. 
    Marshall owned a charter operation, flight school 
    and maintenance operation at the airport. 
    In 1987, Marshall started Capital Airlines in 
    homage to a defunct commercial carrier, where he 
    began as a co-pilot in a Douglas DC-3 in 
    Washington, D.C., back in 1952. 
    He was one of the best pilots at Waterbury-Oxford 
    Airport, according to airport manager Michael 
    O'Donnell. 
    
    "He had thousands of hours of experience," O'Donnell said. "He stopped counting. He was very experienced." Capital Airlines' Web page says that Marshall flew for the former Capital Airlines from 1952 until it was taken over by United Airlines in 1960. He continued flying for United. Marshall retired in 1986 and "felt a bit of nostalgia" so a year later started his own charter and instructional service, according to the airline. He and his staff flew eight-passenger charters to Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, Myrtle Beach, N.C., and the Midwest.
    "He loved to fly. He was very well respected," O'Donnell said. "People here at the airport are distraught." O'Donnell said he first met Marshall in 1990 when he took lessons from one of Marshall's instructors. Marshall's grown children helped operate the business, O'Donnell said Sunday. Marshall's wife recently died of emphysema, O'Donnell said. O'Donnell said the big question around the airport is "Why did the plane crash?" He said Marshall was an excellent pilot and "never a risk taker." He said there were no mechanical problems with the plane and the weather conditions were good.
    "There are a lot of questions and very few answers," O'Donnell said. Officials at the Adirondack Medical Center in Saranac Lake had planned an autopsy Sunday, but did not return a call for comment. The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the incident.
    The Associated Press contributed to this report.










    Plane crash claims 2 from area, Victims
    reported from Roxbury, Sandy Hook

    Monday, July 12, 2004
    By Alexander MacInnes

    © 2004 Republican-American
    
    OXFORD Police officials in Ticonderoga, N.Y., 
    have identified the Connecticut pilot and 
    passenger who died in a Saturday morning plane 
    crash in upstate New York. 
    
    Milton F. Marshall, 75, of Roxbury, owner and 
    operator of Capital Airlines, a charter company 
    and flight school based at the Waterbury-Oxford 
    Airport, was flying passenger Michael Keilty, 40, 
    of Sandy Hook, to Ticonderoga Municipal Airport 
    from Oxford when their plane crashed in a remote 
    area of the Adirondack mountains. 
    
    The Federal Aviation Administration and National 
    Transportation Safety Board are investigating the 
    crash, which was reported shortly after 9:30 a.m. 
    Saturday, according to a statement from 
    Ticonderoga Police Chief Jeffrey D. Cook. 
    
    FAA officials did not return phone calls for 
    comment on the cause of the crash, but witnesses 
    said the conditions were clear. 
    
    The twin-engine airplane crashed in a remote area 
    of Old Fort Mountain, near an old logging trail, 
    northwest of the Ticonderoga Country Club, 
    Ticonderoga dispatcher Michael Alteri said. 
    Emergency and fire crews were able to use that 
    trail to access the crash site. 
    
    Several small fires around the site were extinguished 
    quickly. Mark Wood, a private pilot, helped direct 
    the rescue efforts from his plane. At one point he 
    flew 50 feet over the crash site. 
    
    "It was not pretty," Wood said. "I couldn't even 
    tell what kind of plane it was."

    CONTINUED

    Fred Shaw was playing golf at the time of the crash.
    "The plane was in trouble going over the top of this 
    hill," he said. "I got to the third tee and said 
    'Why is that plane going so low? ' And it crashed." 
    
    Marshall, who was a retired United Airlines pilot with 
    almost 60 years of experience in the cockpit, started 
    his own charter company in 1987 and had a "very clean 
    record," according to his daughter, Kathie Leonzi. 
    He was born in Minnesota and first started flying as 
    a crop-duster in Indiana. He would later fly in the 
    Berlin Airlift after World War II, his daughter said. 
    
    "He was very well respected," Leonzi said. "I think 
    everybody had a great deal of respect for him and 
    everyone was fond of him. He taught a lot of people 
    how to fly and a lot of those people became airline 
    pilots themselves. That was something he was very 
    proud of. He loved to teach." 
    
    Leonzi described her father as someone in "terrific 
    shape" and "well known in the aviation community." 
    
    Waterbury-Oxford Airport Manager Michael O'Donnell 
    said when he needed one more flight in order to 
    receive his pilot's license, he went up with 
    Marshall. When O'Donnell became the airport's 
    director, knew him as a "well respected pilot with 
    a lot of hours" in the cockpit. 
    
    "He never took chances, he was never a risk taker," 
    O'Donnell said. "That's why it is so hard to 
    comprehend this accident. This is a well-respected 
    man, who had more time flying than a lot of us 
    have been alive." 
    
    Although Marshall had a clean record, this was the 
    second fatal crash in more than five months 
    involving a plane operated by Capital Airlines. 
    In February a pilot flying a Capital Airlines Piper 
    from Erie International Airport in Pennsylvania 
    back to Oxford crashed 25 miles outside the Erie 
    airport. The pilot, who was the only person in the 
    plane, reported "a rough running engine," according 
    to the NTSB report. 
    
    Marshall left two sons and five daughters. 
    When asked what drew her father to becoming a pilot, Leonzi said she thought it was "the fascination with flight."
    The Post Star in Glens Falls N.Y. contributed to this report




    SOS CHILDREN VILLAGES - SHARE YOUR ABUNDANCE

    IN FOND AND LOVING REMEMBRANCE OF ALL FRIENDS AND COLLEAGUES WHO ARE NO LONGER WITH US